How to look after your husband 1950 vs 2019

Extracts from the 1950’s edition of Home Economics to women on how to look after their husbands and handy tips for women today.

Have dinner ready

1950

 Plan ahead the night before to have a delicious meal ready on time. This is a way of letting

him know you have been thinking about him and are concerned about his needs. Most men are hungry when they come home and the prospects of a good meal are part of the warm welcome needed. 

2019

 Feel free to plan ahead the night before to have a delicious meal ready on time but don’t worry about actually doing it, it’s the thought that counts.

Prepare yourself 

1950

Take 15 minutes to rest so you will be refreshed when he arrives.  Touch up your make-up, put a ribbon in your hair and be fresh looking. He has just been with a lot of work weary people.  Be a little gay and a little more interesting.  His boring day may need a lift.

2019

Monday, Wednesday and Friday, he’s home first so no doubt he’ll be freshening up and helping himself to your moisturiser again.  Handy tip: Keep a tab on your toiletries by marking the bottles.

Clear away the clutter

 1950

Make one last trip through the main part of the house just before your husband arrives, gathering up school books, toys, paper etc.  Then run a dust cloth over the tables.  Your husband will feel he has reached a haven of rest and order, and it will give you a lift too.

2019 

You’re both used to standing painfully on lego in your socks or finding the remote in the toy box, so neither of you expect anything other than chaos. Housework only ever gets done when you’ve got guests, so it’s always useful to arrange something bi-monthly, just to keep on top of it. 

Prepare the children

1950

Take a few minutes to wash the children’s hands and faces (if they are small), comb their hair, and if necessary, change their clothes.  They are little treasures and he would like to see them playing the part.

2019

Washing is always a battle and bath time is worse, so don’t bother.  Pour two large glasses of wine and wipe the children down with wet wipes.  Call it ‘mini Glastonbury.’

Minimise all noise  

1950

At the time of his arrival, eliminate all noise of washer, drier, dishwasher or vacuum. Try to encourage the children to be quiet.  Be happy to see him.  Greet him with a warm smile and be glad to see him.

2019

Turn on all the machines, the washer, the drier, the dishwasher, the vacuum, the blender, lawnmower and microwave, to drown out the children’s noise. By the time they are asleep it’s late and you can hardly speak.  If any smiling is actually taking place, it’s either screen induced or because rigor mortis has set in. 

Some don’ts

1950

Don’t greet him with problems or complaints.  Don’t complain if he’s late for dinner.  Count this as minor compared with what he might have gone through that day.

2019

I mean…..stupid working hours, the gender paygap, sexual harassment at work, men continuously being promoted over you, the extortionate cost of childcare….. don’t even get me started with the complaints.

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Article By: Dr Amanda J Turner - Women’s Equality Party

womensequality.org.uk